[PDF] ✓ Free Read ✓ 56: Joe DiMaggio and the Last Magic Number in Sports : by Kostya Kennedy ç

By Kostya Kennedy | Comments: ( 566 ) | Date: ( May 31, 2020 )

Winner of the 2011 CASEY Award from Spitball Magazine Seventy baseball seasons ago, on a May afternoon at Yankee Stadium, Joe DiMaggio lined a hard single to leftfield It was the quiet beginning to the most resonant baseball achievement of all time Starting that day, the vaunted Yankee centerfielder kept on hitting at least one hit in game after game after game.In the sWinner of the 2011 CASEY Award from Spitball MagazineSeventy baseball seasons ago, on a May afternoon at Yankee Stadium, Joe DiMaggio lined a hard single to leftfield It was the quiet beginning to the most resonant baseball achievement of all time Starting that day, the vaunted Yankee centerfielder kept on hitting at least one hit in game after game after game.In the summer of 1941, as Nazi forces moved relentlessly across Europe and young American men were drafted by the millions, it seemed only a matter of time before the U.S went to war The nation was apprehensive Yet for two months in that tense summer, America was captivated by DiMaggio s astonishing hitting streak In 56, Kostya Kennedy tells the remarkable story of how the streak found its way into countless lives, from the Italian kitchens of Newark to the playgrounds of Queens to the San Francisco streets of North Beach from the Oval Office of FDR to the Upper West Side apartment where Joe s first wife, Dorothy, the movie starlet, was expecting a child In this crisp, evocative narrative Joe DiMaggio emerges in a previously unseen light, a 26 year old on the cusp of becoming an icon He comes alive a driven ballplayer, a mercurial star and a conflicted husband as the tension and the scrutiny upon him build with each passing day.DiMaggio s achievement lives on as the greatest of sports records Alongside the story of DiMaggio s dramatic quest, Kennedy deftly examines the peculiar nature of hitting streaks and with an incisive, modern day perspective gets inside the number itself, as its sheer improbability heightens both the math and the magic of 56 games in a row.


  • Title: 56: Joe DiMaggio and the Last Magic Number in Sports
  • Author: Kostya Kennedy
  • ISBN: 9781603201773
  • Page: 320
  • Format: Hardcover

About Author:

Kostya Kennedy

Kostya Kennedy Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the 56: Joe DiMaggio and the Last Magic Number in Sports book, this is one of the most wanted Kostya Kennedy author readers around the world.



Comments 56: Joe DiMaggio and the Last Magic Number in Sports

  • Don Hamilton

    A great read, especially this time of year when baseball fever hits. The most interesting aspect of the book was learning how the American people followed the incredible 56 game hitting streak while at the same time dealing with the very serious problems brewing over in Europe (Summer of 1941).


  • Joelwakefield

    A great baseball book, capturing nicely the day to day rhythm of the game, with the added element of an unlikely streak and the building pressure that the streak created. The book does a very nice job of juxtaposing the world events of 1941 on the baseball events, giving insight not only into the game but also into the feeling of a nation as the world slipped into war. I was particularly interested in the snapshots into individual games along the way - the game relatively early in the streak whe [...]


  • Gary Geiger

    Joe DiMaggio probably wasn't the Greatest Living Ballplayer when that vote was taken in 1969. A better case can be made for Ted Williams, Mickey Mantle, or Willie Mays. If you are going by career numbers as opposed to a player at his peak, you can add Stan Musial to that group. But you can make the argument that DiMaggio was better than his numbers for intangible reasons (I don't buy this argument,) or that he would have been better in another era or another park.That doesn't mean that he wasn't [...]


  • Ben

    Sports records and streaks no longer captivate the country the way they once did. For one reason, performance enhancing drugs have both tainted their mystique and increased the frequency of their being broken. One wonders whether the recordbooks of the future will have multiple asterisks next to every entry. But Joe DiMaggio's streak in 1941 of 56 consecutive games with at least one hit will likely stand forever. It also came at precisely the time when our worried nation needed a distraction fro [...]


  • Dave

    If it weren't for Cleveland's 3rd baseman playing DiMaggio to pull this book may have been titled "73". Kennedy, despite more than a few grammar problems with words left out of sentences and a bit too much talk of the kids imitating the Yankee Clipper in NYC stickball games, does a good job discussing the 56 game hitting streak and its historical and statistical context. By any numerical analysis, it's a complete aberration. No one else has come within 12 games. However, when you factor in that [...]


  • Bruce

    I enjoyed the book. It very effectively details one of the incredible athletic achievements of our time, and does so against the backdrop of pre-WWII United States. This seems to be the definitive treatment of "the streak," and the author's details, research and writing style serve the book very effectively. I found myself fascinated by the differences and (yes) similarities between the ball players of 1941 and those of today. This is a great baseball book that fully describes the record "that w [...]


  • Don Gorman

    (2). This is almost a 4 star baseball book, but for general reading it certainly doesn't rate that well. The DiMaggio story is fascinating, but there is so much lost in the correlations and development of the war effort, his relationship with his wife and his unique idiosyncrasies outside of baseball. I'm glad I read it, as the details on the hit streak were terrific, but Joe will remain a sort of neurotic weirdo in my mind regardless of his amazing prowress on the diamond. The analysis of data [...]


  • Karen & Gerard

    As a rule, I do not read a lot of sports books because I find most of them to be boring. However, this book covers the 56-game hitting streak of Joe DiMaggio but it's more than just a game-by-game recap. The author really sets the scene of life in 1941. I enjoyed this book a lot! It took me just two days to read it. Even though I hate the Yankees, I loved "56—Joe DiMaggio And The Last Magic Number In Sports." If you are a baseball fan, I think you will love this one too!


  • Jim

    This book is about Joe DiMaggio’s 56 game hitting streak that encompassed games played between May 15th and July 16th, 1941. Between those dates Joe DiMaggio got at least one hit in every game, a record no one has even come close to breaking since.Everything in this work uses “the streak” as its anchor point. If you keep that in mind you won’t be disappointed at not getting a fuller biography of Joe DiMaggio, or salacious details of his marriage to Marilyn Monroe, or a wider discussion o [...]


  • Zach Franz

    A marvelous read. Kennedy knows his material well, partly due to his clear interest in it and partly from the exhaustive research he conducted. His writing is equally impressive. Details abound; he makes you feel the streets and fields of 1941. Joe DiMaggio becomes a fully-formed character, a real human. In some ways--despite principally covering only one summer of Joltin' Joe's life--this is a biography of DiMaggio. That's how closely his identity is tied to the titular, extraordinary achieveme [...]


  • Boris

    A very interesting read on Dimaggio's hitting streak and the times as the streak unfolded against the backdrop of World War II.The history and nature of hitting streaks was discussed and made one aware of how truly difficult they are.As one would expect, there was much additional 'color' on the other famous and obscure players of the time. Also a reminder of the huge social impact of the game of baseball and its centrality in American life.


  • Michael Wright

    I'm even more convinced that this record will never be broken. The circumstances surrounding every hit of every game on the way to this achievement are impossible to imagine ever happening again. As such a lifelong fan of the game I don't know if this is comforting to know the record is safe with such a great man, or discouraging that I will likely never see anything close in my lifetime.


  • Janet Roland

    Well written. Took me back in time. Interesting back stories.


  • Jim

    Joe D the best player of all time ? Maybe so !!!! 56 Game hit. streak may never be broken .


  • Harold Kasselman

    This is a wonderful and totally satisfying read. It is not merely a journal of box scores and daily recaps of the games in the streak. Rather it is a thoughtful portrayal of what the streak meant to New Yorkers most notably, but to American at large. Nothing captured the imagination of immigrants and especially Italians quite like their Guissepe from the San Francisco Bay area in his anguishing quest to make baseball history. But it also mesmerized all baseball fans and even those not faithful t [...]


  • Larry Hostetler

    This may have been a much more interesting book had I not recently read another biography of Joe DiMaggio. But having done so there is a great deal of biography in with the recounting of the 56 game streak. Unfortunately, I would estimate that the streak itself accounts for less than 1/3 of the book. For instance, games 50-53 with the following information on the games and at bats: "DiMaggio had run his hitting streak to 50 straight by singling in the first inning, and then added two more sinces [...]


  • Brian Manville

    It was May 15, 1941. As America watched newsreels and read about the fascist menace in Europe, another type of horror gripped the American people. It started out harmlessly enough, a reserved, handsome man from San Francisco - wearing pinstripes and the number 5 on his back. The son of Italian immigrants and married to an actress, he had come east in 1936 after setting the Pacific Coast League ablaze with the San Francisco Seals. But, on that particular afternoon in 1941, Joe DiMaggio began cast [...]


  • Zach Koenig

    Joe DiMaggio's 56-game hitting streak in 1941 still stands today as one of the most mythical baseball records to ever hold up over time. While a tainted Steroid Era of baseball wiped away many of the power-hitting records from decades gone by, Joe D.'s streak remains intact. Thus, author Kostya Kennedy gives us a book all about that magnificent streak. the "ins" and the "outs" of it.Primarily, this book focuses on the context of the streak, including the state of the country (i.e. readying for w [...]


  • Lance

    56 is one of those numbers in which baseball fans immediately know the record or achievement to which it denotes, along with 714, .406, or 511. In the case of 56, that is the number of consecutive games in which Yankee outfielder Joe DiMaggio got at least one base hit in 1941. It is considered to be a record that may never be broken, and DiMaggio’s journey on the way to achieving this remarkable feat is chronicled in this excellent book by author Kostya Kennedy.The book is much more than simpl [...]


  • Nathan

    56 takes on the streak from every angle. Kennedy brings you deep into the moment and then pulls you back out for the view from space. 360, inside and out. The book jumps from game to game, place to place, era to era, but it never loses you. Every chapter dovetails into the next. Every jump back in time or forward to the present comes at just the right time when you're wanting more. It is about the streak in all of its context with all of its players. My favorite aspect of the book is ts singular [...]


  • Spiros

    I came to this fresh from reading Jane Leavy's The Last Boy, in which she disparages Joe DiMaggio for his stand-offish attitude to her hero, Mickey Mantle: from where I sit, I can't see that DiMaggio really owed Mantle anything. DiMaggio was stand-offish to pretty much everyone and everything (a trait which Nick Tosches, in Dino, his epic biography of Dean Martin, identified as "lontano"), and in Mantle he obviously saw a cafone, which is pretty much what Mantle was. Joe played in 10 World Serie [...]


  • Tad

    See my full review in the Deseret News here: deseretnews/article/70Kennedy has made "56" much more than a biography of a streak. It also serves as psychological profile of DiMaggio, of his bittersweet first marriage, of the nature of high performance and of how one surpassing record turned a 26-year-old superstar into a great American icon.Kennedy is at his best when he plumbs DiMaggio's psyche, explores the love he and his pregnant wife Dorothy shared and considers the streak with players then [...]


  • Clayton Campbell

    This book is all about Joe DiMaggio life story growing up. He was born November 25, 1914. Joe grew up playing baseball his whole life. He eventually made it to the big leagues and played for one of the greatest teams of all time, The New York Yankees. Joe accomplishes many things as the Yankees center fielder. He was a three time American League MVP. He was also the athlete of the year in 1941. Joe DiMaggio is known for his incredible hitting streak. DiMaggio went 56 games getting a hit in every [...]


  • Jack

    What a wonderful book.I love baseball. I love the history of the game. This combines both with a narrative that flows like a novel. It is the story of a ball player who made a hit in 56 straight games.It’s the early summer of 1941. Men are being drafted; the country is changing over to a war footing but December 7 is still months away. And the country has turned its eyes toward a young man wearing pin-strips who plays center field for the NY Yankees.Joe DiMaggio, one of the greatest ball playe [...]


  • Mike

    56 is definitely a magic number and one that Kostya Kennedy examines thoroughly both in the chronology and the sideways glances that tell us about other streaks and other players. It is insightful and except for the attempt to connect us with local teens in useless vignettes, it is detailed in giving us context and ultimate in examining the unlikely sequence that would produce a hitting streak two weeks longer than any other.Somehow DiMaggio is a machine of consistency, a man who lacks love-abil [...]


  • David B.

    I really enjoyed this book and a great read during baseball season. Kennedy does a good job of explaining not only the 56 game streak but also what was going on in the world and America at the time and how Italian Americans were viewed and treated in 1941. I also liked his view from here where he gives his own opinions on the streak and what was going on in 1941. What I really found interesting is how close DiMaggio came in several games to not getting to 56. Last at bats and in one game was it [...]


  • Nick

    I loved it when the author compared the streak to other players, showed how hard it was, and how impossible matching this record is. I wish the author had wrote more along those lines. This is quiet possibly the single most impossible event in any sport. 56 games in a row! Getting a hit three out of ten times is considered really good. This is probably the only record in sports that will never be broken. That being said, the story elements really seem to drag. Kennedy isn't necessarily a story t [...]


  • John Kaufmann

    Good book, following DiMaggio through his 56 game hitting streak in the summer of 1941 - but not as good as I expected, and probably not as good as I think it could have been (I hate saying that, because it implies I think I could do better than the author - and I doubt I could). The story mostly stayed with DiMaggio and the Yankees day-to-day schedule, which by itself made for good reading. But I guess I expected a little more context about what the country was experiencing at the time and how [...]


  • Ty

    Jolting Joe's 56 game hitting streak is definitely the biggest remaining record in baseball, and likely the greatest individual record in all of sports. this book covers the events of every game of the streak in some detail, but the most interesting parts cover Joe's life growing up in San Francisco, the nature of the game of baseball in that time, fascinating social commentary on life in the 40's and, best of all, a description of the USA as the country prepared for WWII. DiMaggio's streak was [...]


  • Jordana Schmier

    I really wanted to like this book and the parts that were about the streak itself and its place in baseball history were good. However, the context elements were up and down. The state of the nation and the influence of WWII were well-written but the random characters here and there whose thoughts about DiMaggio that we learn - are they all even real? I was never sure if it was worth remembering who they were. Some turned up again in a sentence three chapters later, some did not. The epilogue, w [...]


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  • [PDF] ✓ Free Read ✓ 56: Joe DiMaggio and the Last Magic Number in Sports : by Kostya Kennedy ç
    320 Kostya Kennedy
  • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ✓ Free Read ✓ 56: Joe DiMaggio and the Last Magic Number in Sports : by Kostya Kennedy ç
    Posted by:Kostya Kennedy
    Published :2020-02-11T20:26:55+00:00