[PDF] ✓ Unlimited ✓ Judgment: How Winning Leaders Make Great Calls : by Noel M. Tichy Warren G. Bennis µ

By Noel M. Tichy Warren G. Bennis | Comments: ( 811 ) | Date: ( Nov 19, 2019 )

With good judgment, little else matters Without it, nothing else matters Whether we re talking about United States presidents, CEOs, Major League coaches, or wartime generals, leaders are remembered for their best and worst judgment calls In the face of ambiguity, uncertainty, and conflicting demands, the quality of a leader s judgment determines the fate of the entir With good judgment, little else matters Without it, nothing else matters Whether we re talking about United States presidents, CEOs, Major League coaches, or wartime generals, leaders are remembered for their best and worst judgment calls In the face of ambiguity, uncertainty, and conflicting demands, the quality of a leader s judgment determines the fate of the entire organization That s why judgment is the essence of leadership Yet despite its importance, judgment has always been a fairly murky concept The leadership literature has been conspicuously quiet on what, exactly, defines it Does judgment differ from common sense or gut instinct Is it a product of luck Of smarts Or is there a process for making consistently good calls Noel Tichy and Warren Bennis have each spent decades studying and teaching leadership and advising top CEOs such as Jack Welch and Howard Schultz Now, in their first collaboration, they offer a powerful framework for making tough calls when the stakes are high and the right path is far from obvious They show how to recognize the critical moment before a judgment call, when swift and decisive action is essential, and also how to execute a decision after the call Tichy and Bennis bring their three dimensional model to life with interviews with world class leaders who have thrived or suffered because of their judgment calls These stories include Jeff Immelt, CEO of General Electric, whose judgment to grow through research and development transformed GE into the world s premier technology growth company Joel Klein, chancellor of the New York City Department of Education, who made tough calls about teachers, students, and parents while turning around a troubled school system Jim McNerney, CEO of Boeing, whose strategic judgment helped him reinvigorate his company and restore a culture of trust and respect The late general Wayne Downing, who found an unexpected opportunity in the midst of crisis when he led the Special Operations raid to capture Manuel Noriega A G Lafley, CEO of Procter Gamble, who bet 57 billion to purchase Gillette and reinvent his company Brad Anderson, CEO of Best Buy, who made the call to commit totally to a customer centric strategy and led his people to execute it Whether you re running a small department or a global corporation, Judgment will give you a framework for evaluating any situation, making the call, and correcting if necessary during the execution phase It will show you how to handle the overlapping domains of people, strategy, and crisis management And it will help you teach your entire team to make the right call often No organization can afford to neglect this crucial discipline and no previous book has ever brought it into such clear focus.


  • Title: Judgment: How Winning Leaders Make Great Calls
  • Author: Noel M. Tichy Warren G. Bennis
  • ISBN: 9781591841531
  • Page: 454
  • Format: Hardcover

About Author:

Noel M. Tichy Warren G. Bennis

Noel M. Tichy Warren G. Bennis Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Judgment: How Winning Leaders Make Great Calls book, this is one of the most wanted Noel M. Tichy Warren G. Bennis author readers around the world.



Comments Judgment: How Winning Leaders Make Great Calls

  • Bill Donhiser

    I had this book on my to read shelf for a long time and finally decided to take it. it is well written and contains many interesting extensive case studies. The down side it is a little bit dated but that is my fault for waiting. The concept of a teachable point of view is great and it is worth the time.


  • Gen

    Probably was a much better read 10 years ago (copyright is 2007.) Case studies were out-dated and heavy emphasis on bottom line.


  • Christine Staszko

    I figured the topic of judgement would be easier reading then everything I had been taking in about business strategy lately. I was pleased a lot of the case studies weren’t ones that had been popping up in a lot of the business books I had been reading (i.e. Apple, IKEA, etc) as well. A few real world examples the book goes into in the most depth were very interesting to me; my favorite of these stories was of how Best Buy stores came about. I had no idea how independent each store was in dec [...]


  • Nick

    Judgment was hugely disappointing. Warren Bennis is a guru, and the book has been talked up no end. And to give it its due, the case studies are extensive, often fascinating, and well-researched. But the insights are so obvious as to be banal. We learn, for example, that leaders have to have "character and courage." And "values." Come on. The taxonomy of judgment, according to Bennis and Tichy include "pre-decision," the "call", and the "execution." There are 3 kinds of judgments that matter: ju [...]


  • David

    THE best analysis on making the critical 'call'. Great framework explained with many interesting (famous) examples of success and failure. Even a handbook at the end. First, the Framework:* Domain: people, strategy, crisis* Phases: Pre, The Call, Execution* Process: Sense, Frame, Mobilize, Call, Execute, Adjust* Knowledge: Self, Social NW, Org, Contextual Also* Teachable POV: Criticality of story telling ability. Esp. by CEO* Character: having clear value* Courage: having the guts to make the ca [...]


  • Shaun

    This is a book by famed leadership guru Warren Bennis on making judgements. It focuses on making judgements in three realms: Key People, Strategy, and Crisis. It talks about having a Teachable Point of View (TPOV). The crux of the book is we need more leaders with better judgement skills. I hope our president and political leaders could make better judgements instead of doing things based on politcal expediency. The following areas influence our judgement: 1. self-knowledge2. personal values &am [...]


  • Edwin B

    I didn't even know if this book was positively reviewed, or not, when I decided to read it - the reason being the subject matter of leadership judgment fascinated me - and my curiousity was piqued when this title came up in my online browsing of audiobooks available through my local library. It didn't show up in a search of New York Times bestsellers, but were there any practical gems I could pick up regardless of this book's popularity? So I read it, and found out about the dynamics surrounding [...]


  • Chris

    Three big takeaways from this book:First, leaders should develop a teachable point of view or TPOV. A leader who has a consistent TPOV brings a predictable perspective to every discussion. After a while, it becomes the organizations way of viewing/processing/addressing issues. Throughout the book, the authors also talk about the value of creating a story for the organization. Write the story. Tell the story. Tell it often. Third, invest in the leadership culture. Nearly all the leaders profiled [...]


  • Afton

    This book bounced around a lot. I didn't like the format of how the book was organized. I wished they had just taken a case study and told us the good and bad points. This book is very CEO business driven. The last chapter dealt with education though. I didn't take away a lot from it other than the fact that the people that a leader hires to work with can make a break a company, and how a leader deals with a crisis can make a big difference in a company's future.


  • Megan

    i've tried finishing this one but i finally gave up on iti guess i was looking for more advice, rather than case study after case studyybe that comes farther in the book than i got but i decided that i'm not interested enough in sticking it out to find out


  • Sunlita

    I even haven't got a full-time job when I read a review (in Business Week) about this book. They reviewed everything about this book, that made me speechless now. Maybe I'll buy this book, after I have some extra money to spent off, for my leadership improvement.


  • Joseph Serwach

    Great work


  • Rusty

    2 of the world's best teaming up on a subject that's scarcely been tackled so extensivly.


  • Doug Allen

    A bit dated (includes Hurd's short-lived turnaround of HP) and a little too much focus on Welch and Immelt's work at GE. Some good cases and frameworks.


  • Lara

    People, Strategy, and Crisis.


  • Lori Grant

    A must-read book on leadership for knowledge workers, managers, directors, C-levels, and entrepreneurs.


  • Larry

    I recommend this book to all leaders. It's a good read that shows the complexities of decision making.


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  • [PDF] ✓ Unlimited ✓ Judgment: How Winning Leaders Make Great Calls : by Noel M. Tichy Warren G. Bennis µ
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  • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ✓ Unlimited ✓ Judgment: How Winning Leaders Make Great Calls : by Noel M. Tichy Warren G. Bennis µ
    Posted by:Noel M. Tichy Warren G. Bennis
    Published :2019-08-09T14:50:23+00:00