Best Read [John Dickson Carr] ï The House at Satan's Elbow || [Religion Book] PDF ☆

By John Dickson Carr | Comments: ( 366 ) | Date: ( Nov 20, 2019 )

Pennington Barclay, master of Greengrove, is murderously attacked in his library by something that exits from a completely locked room The entire household including Pennington s beautiful young wife, and his nephew, who is the heir to Greengorove by virtue of a newly discovered will is in an uproar Estelle Barclay, Pennington s spinsterish and psychically inclined sPennington Barclay, master of Greengrove, is murderously attacked in his library by something that exits from a completely locked room The entire household including Pennington s beautiful young wife, and his nephew, who is the heir to Greengorove by virtue of a newly discovered will is in an uproar Estelle Barclay, Pennington s spinsterish and psychically inclined sister, insists the attack was the work of Greengrove s ghost.Enter Dr Gideon Fell.Armed with his everlasting cigar and a wicked cane, this obstreperous extrovert succeeds in frightening everybody For as horror piles on horror throughout the night, Gideon Fell evidences interest in one person only the spirit of the long departed Mr Justice Wildfare.But Fell was not up to any supernatural hijinks, as someone well knew the one who was most frightened of all.


  • Title: The House at Satan's Elbow
  • Author: John Dickson Carr
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 196
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback

About Author:

John Dickson Carr

AKA Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson and Roger Fairbairn.John Dickson Carr was born in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, in 1906 It Walks by Night, his first published detective novel, featuring the Frenchman Henri Bencolin, was published in 1930 Apart from Dr Fell, whose first appearance was in Hag s Nook in 1933, Carr s other series detectives published under the nom de plume of Carter Dickson were the barrister Sir Henry Merrivale, who debuted in The Plague Court Murders 1934.



Comments The House at Satan's Elbow

  • Gigi

    The more John Dickson Carr I read, the more I see that his books are hit-or-miss. Carr is one of the most brilliant mystery writers of all time, who penned some of my favorite Golden Age of detective fiction mysteries, but sometimes his wit is forced and the locked-room puzzle not so puzzling. The House at Satan's Elbow had some nice elements and I'm glad to have spent two evenings with the book, but it's not one of his best.


  • Colin

    This has all the ingredients of a classic,Carr.The creepy old country house,the hints of the supernatural and of course a locked room mystery.Sadly it never reaches the heights of his best work.This comes late in his output and is a good read,but certainly far from essential.The locked room solution is a bit of a letdown,he has devised far better methods.So on the whole,if you're a fan you'll probably enjoy it,just don't expect too much.


  • Laura Rye

    ***Spoiler**** While this is supposed to be a "locked room murder mystery"well, actually it isn'tI guess you could call it an "locked room attempted suicide mystery".but, it was well written---the third Dr. Gideon Fell book I've read---will definitely be looking for more. The back of the book--my 1976 paperback--was so misleadingbut, it made me read on to see when it was going to happend even though it didn't, it was very very clever.


  • Ian Wood

    This is an abbreviated version of the review on my blog. Note that the blog version contains several links which aren't available here.SPOILERS!The house at Satan's Elbow is a detective mystery novel published in 1965 - although it feels like it's taking place a couple of decades earlier! Satan's Elbow is a fictional creation. It's where Greengrove sits: the home of Pennington Barclay.The novel begins with Nick Barclay inviting his old friend Garret Anderson down to Greengrove. There's a big fus [...]


  • Tony

    THE HOUSE AT SATAN’S ELBOW. (1965). John Dickson Carr. ***.This is a Gideon Fell locked-room mystery – his specialty. Many of the novels in this series, however, really stretch events to make sure everything comes out in the end. In the current novel, we meet up with a mister Pennington, the owner and occupant of Greengrove, a manor on the spit of land known as Satan’s Elbow. At least he thinks he’s the owner – until a new will of his father’s is found that changes things and leaves [...]


  • Larissa

    My first John Dickson Carr novel—a Christmas gift bought for the express purpose of being fitting reading for a few days in a country cabin, which it very much was. Loads of melodrama (gasping, running toward one's lover just to touch hands before turning and running back in the other direction, be-veiled ghosts, passionate embraces, needlessly complicated back story), and lots of exposition and character explanation delivered through feverish dialog. Take for example, the introduction that th [...]


  • Jack Chapman

    Dickson Carr was probably the greatest of the Golden Age locked room mystery writers but this is a late work (he wrote only two more Gideon Fell novels after 1965) and the classic mechanisms of the genre are starting to creak in the age of The Beatles and the miniskirt. Carr makes some attempt to reflect the age - the stock characters of the young romantic leads, who in earlier books behave very chastely, here are implied to have had a rather physical relationship during a holiday in Paris! But [...]


  • J.V. Seem

    Like other John Dickson Carr novels, this one has a great premise: Nick Barclay, accompanied by his friend Garrett, returns to the old family home to settle the matter of a deceased grandfather's two wills. Over the scene hangs the tale of an elusive ghostly figure who is said to be a former inhabitant of the house; an evil judge who always wore a robe and face-veil.The story seems a bit more sluggish than usual, however. About halfway, you realize that the story has only covered a single evenin [...]


  • Nancy Butts

    #21 in Gideon Fell series and I am pleased to report that Carr seems to have returned to his "original" approach with this book: this is more like the Fell books I fell in love with, set in a rambling house in the English countryside, with hints of ghosts, and a cast of eccentric gentry who are all at each other's throats. Perfect! Although I have to say that I dislike Carr's female characters, all of whom are neurotic and mercurial. Didn't he know any stalwart women? :D


  • Jean

    I thought this book by Carr, whose work I have not read, was decent. I was kept in the dark as to whom the villain was until the end. I didn't care for the mushiness of the romance, especially on the part of the male character but that was typical of the times, I'm guessing. It did seem somewhat over the top. The mystery itself was good, the characters interestingly written, and the setting appropriate.


  • Taylor Hansen

    3.5 stars - Carr's surplus of verbosity and dialogue can be a bit difficult to follow at times but I definitely liked the plot and characters- the "locked room" mystery was stretched a bit thin in this case but overall a good "Manor House" murder mystery.


  • Robert Henderson

    It was OK, and the locked room mystery quite plausable, but a fairly pedestrian written story. Certainly not one of his best.


  • Bruce

    Written near the end of his career, not one of Carr's best or most compelling efforts, though still a decent read.


  • Michele bookloverforever

    master of the locked roomstery. ran through the Dr. fell series as fast as I could find them.


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  • Best Read [John Dickson Carr] ï The House at Satan's Elbow || [Religion Book] PDF ☆
    196 John Dickson Carr
  • thumbnail Title: Best Read [John Dickson Carr] ï The House at Satan's Elbow || [Religion Book] PDF ☆
    Posted by:John Dickson Carr
    Published :2019-08-03T20:09:56+00:00