[PDF] Download ✓ Hell to Pay: Operation Downfall and the Invasion of Japan, 1945-1947 | by ↠ D.M. Giangreco

By D.M. Giangreco | Comments: ( 587 ) | Date: ( Feb 17, 2020 )

Hell To Pay Operation Downfall and the Invasion of Japan, 1945 1947 is the most comprehensive examination of the myriad complex issues that comprised the strategic plans for the American invasion of Japan U.S planning for the invasion and military occupation of Imperial Japan was begun in 1943, two years before the dropping of atom bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki In fiHell To Pay Operation Downfall and the Invasion of Japan, 1945 1947 is the most comprehensive examination of the myriad complex issues that comprised the strategic plans for the American invasion of Japan U.S planning for the invasion and military occupation of Imperial Japan was begun in 1943, two years before the dropping of atom bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki In final form, Operation Downfall called for a massive Allied invasion on a scale dwarfing D Day to be carried out in two stages In the first stage, Operation Olympic, after the dropping of multiple atom bombs the U.S Sixth Army would lead the southern most assault on the Home Island of Kyushu to secure airfields and anchorages to support the second stage, Operation Coronet, a decisive invasion of the industrial heartland of Japan through the Tokyo Plain, 500 miles to the north, led by the First and Eighth armies These facts are well known and have been recounted with varying degrees of accuracy in a variety of books and articles A common theme in these works is their reliance on a relatively few declassified high level planning documents An attempt to fully understand how both the U.S and Japan planned to conduct the massive battles subsequent to the initial landings was not dealt with in these books beyond the skeletal U.S outlines formulated nine months before the initial land battles were to commence, and than a year before the anticipated climactic series of battles near Tokyo On the Japanese side, plans for Operation Ketsu go, the decisive battle in the Home Islands, have been unexamined below the strategic level and seldom consisted of than a rehash of U.S intelligence estimates of Kamikaze aircraft available for the defense of Kyushu Hell To Pay examines the invasion of Japan in light of substantial new sources, unearthed in both familiar and obscure archives, and brings the political and military ramifications of the enormous casualties and loss of material projected by trying to bring the Pacific War to a conclusion by a military invasion of the island This ground breaking history counters the revisionist interpretations questioning the rationale for the use of the atom bomb and shows that the U.S decision was based on very real estimates of the truly horrific cost of a conventional invasion of Japan.


  • Title: Hell to Pay: Operation Downfall and the Invasion of Japan, 1945-1947
  • Author: D.M. Giangreco
  • ISBN: 9781591143161
  • Page: 395
  • Format: Hardcover

About Author:

D.M. Giangreco

D.M. Giangreco Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Hell to Pay: Operation Downfall and the Invasion of Japan, 1945-1947 book, this is one of the most wanted D.M. Giangreco author readers around the world.



Comments Hell to Pay: Operation Downfall and the Invasion of Japan, 1945-1947

  • Steven Hull

    There is an on-going, seven decade old debate about whether the Japanese Empire would have surrendered absent the dropping of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs. The simple answer is “yes”. Japan was the lone surviving member of the Axis Alliance. Surrounded by the combined forces of history’s greatest military alliance, Japan’s fate was sealed. But, capitulation at what cost, and how long would it take? Answers to these questions are the heart of this on-gong debate, with those opp [...]


  • Ken

    Puts the lie to recent revisionist histories of the decision to drop the atomic bomb with well-researched facts taken from both American and Japanese sources. Every decision involving war involves re-distributing death. No matter what is done or not done, people will die as a result. The only questions are who, how, and how many. Giangreco's analysis, well supported by primary sources, demonstrates that Truman's decision to drop the atomic bomb saved the lives of hundreds of thousands of America [...]


  • Urey Patrick

    This is a data rich account of the plans, resources, strategies and preparations on both Japanese and US sides for the inevitable, unavoidable invasions of Japan - Kyushu followed by the final invasion of the Tokyo plains on Honshu. Truman's decision to nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki ended the war - unexpectedly. There is a lot of revisionist history critical of Truman's decision, and arguing that it was not necessary - revisionist and wrong. Monthly casualties in Japanese held territor [...]


  • DoctorM

    An excellent account of the plans for Operation Downfall, the planned invasion of the Japanese Home Islands. Good presentation of the evolution of American plans and the countermeasures planned by the Japanese--- though the book is marred by egregiously bad proofreading. Giangreco makes it clear that the two-pronged American invasion would've been a hard-fought and difficult operation, and that the Japanese would've been a hard enemy to destroy, even in those last starving months of the war. He [...]


  • Rod

    Remember the brouhaha associated the Smithsonian's 50th anniversary exhibit on the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings? The exhibits implied that the bombings were unnecessary and amounted to war crimes. Veterans that suggested that the invasion of Japan would have lead to far more deaths (on both sides) were discounted by the professional historians.Read this book for a thorough assessment of the planned invasions. In short, not only would the casualties on both sides sides been horrific and [...]


  • Jeffrey

    Exhaustively researched and detailed reconstruction of the US plans to invade Japan in late 1945 if the war had not ended after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The book is written by an unabashed proponent of the American choice to drop the atomic bomb on Japan, but it does lay out a highly convincing case that fewer lives were ultimately lost through the use of nuclear weapons to end the war. Fascinating but not stronger on documentation than narrative.


  • J.w. Larrick

    An exhaustive analysis of the plans for Operation Downfall. Those who question what an invasion of the home islands of Japan would have cost in carnage of American lives should read this book. Maybe the most sobering of chapters was "Half a million Purple Hearts" in which was detailed the grim ordering and production of massive numbers of the medal in anticipation of invasion . The navy alone had an initial order of 135,000 of the medal. Quite a lesson in the enormous killing fields it would hav [...]


  • Kenneth Flusche

    A tough book to read, not sure if written by an accountant (Statistics) or politician (Repeats and goes in circles) But the fact remains as told me by my WWII veteran friends. Those two bombs saved from one to three million human lives May my friends rest in peace and may nobody explode a nuke in test or war again.


  • James Clark

    I always wondered about the allied plan to invade Japan in WWII. Most accounts of WWII leading up to the A-Bomb droppings on Hiroshima and Nagasaki but do not get into the detail of what would have happened IF we had to really invade Japan and take it by force. In years passed, there have been some loud voices against the dropping of these A-Bombs on Japan saying we could have taken Japan conventionally. This book is all about FACTS. I don't know another book that I have ever read about WWII in [...]


  • Josh Liller

    A good recent book that delves in the many details of Operation Downfall (the invasion of Japan) and its two sub-operations: Olympic (Kyushu, fall 1945) and Coronet (Honshu, spring 1946).I have read several books about the end of the war against Japan, but none of them go into the depth of this book. Both the American and Japanese sides are examined: their plans and concerns (even the details of medical planning like hospital beds and bloody supply), and factors that they didn't consider that wo [...]


  • Tony Held

    The Last WordThis book is the last word on Operation Downfall and the decision to try the atomic bomb beforehand as a means of shocking the Japanese leadership into surrender. Had Japan's militarists continued to hold sway after Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the invasion of Japan would have begun, with devastating losses suffered by both sides.Giangreco exposes many misconceptions about the state of Japan by the summer of 1945. He reveals that far from being out of aviation fuel for their fleets of ka [...]


  • Mike Kershaw

    This is a detailed examination of the Japanese and American planning for the Invasion of Japan. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in the global challenges faced by the US Army in World War II, the decision to drop the Atomic Bombs or anyone who has read historical accounts of the last year of the War in the Pacific and desires more detail on the invasion plans. However, it is not well-written or well organized and therefore I would recommend Richard Frank's "Downfall" which [...]


  • David

    Probably one of the least likely, or perhaps, least interesting subjects to delve in to concerning the Second World War. This books discusses contemporary perceptions, and the reality of the projected Invasion of Japan. That is important as it can frame the discussion of the US decision to use Atomic weapons against Japan. This has been dealt with in other sources, and from many perspectives. I find this a very well researched volume, using both American and Japanese sources. He may not have spe [...]


  • Brian Miracle

    While not an especially easy read, this book succeeded in showing the preparations by the Allies and Japan for Operation Downfall, the invasion of Japan scheduled for fall, 1945 and spring, 1946. The book shows that the Japanese knew where the Allied landing zones would be, and they were rapidly reinforcing those areas in the months prior to Japan's surrender.The book gives details of the expected casualties (both Allied and Japanese) that were expected as a result of the invasion. The casualtie [...]


  • Paul

    This was a turgid book to read. Commentators have said that the book reads like an operations order or an intelligence study by the military. Having said that, I am glad I read the book so as to flesh out my taking a look at the decision to drop the atom bomb. The author limits his study to "strategic tactics" by looking at the operations orders for both Japan and the US in the last year of WWII. His conclusion that the Japanese had the will and capacity to resist for some length of time if inva [...]


  • Sean O'Hara

    This book purports to be a study of what would've happened in the US had invaded Japan in late 1945, but in truth it is a thinly disguised defense of Truman's decision to use nuclear weapons. There is certainly a strong case to be made that Truman made the right decision, but Giangreco doesn't make. While he does score many points debunking the idea that Japan was a paper tiger ready to collapse, pointing out that the people making that argument are often misinterpreting facts, for instance taki [...]


  • K.H. Vaughan

    Puts the lie to recent revisionist histories of the decision to drop the atomic bomb with well-researched facts taken from both American and Japanese sources. Every decision involving war involves re-distributing death. No matter what is done or not done, people will die as a result. The only questions are who, how, and how many. Giangreco's analysis, well supported by primary sources, demonstrates that Truman's decision to drop the atomic bomb saved the lives of hundreds of thousands of America [...]


  • charlie

    This is a book for war gamers with a gigantic table, a huge map of the Pacific Ocean and thousands of little figurines. The level of detail is impeccably thorough and I learned a lot about the logistical planning into massive invasions and the state of play in August 1945 in the Pacific Ocean.What would have happened if Truman had not authorized the 2 a-bombs on the Japanese mainland? Its all here in unassailably minute statistical detail. You get a great sense of what the other choice was sitti [...]


  • David Teska

    The story was fascinating in that (1) the Japanese were far from down-and-out but we really getting ready for the invasion they knew was coming, (2) they were pretty close to knowing where the two invasions would be and (3) it was going to be a "long hard slog" for the US and made Normany look like a simple river crossing against light resistence. Having said that, the book wasn't organized very well; often the author would introduce a topic and define it, only to re-introduce it later as though [...]


  • Mike O'Brien

    Just to be clear, "Hell to Pay" is NOT alternate history. It's an examination of the landing plans of the Allies and defense plans of the Japanese regarding the proposed invasion of Japan at the end of WWII. If the Japanese had not surrendered then the Allies were going to invade. The scary part is that the Japanese had most of the plan figured out, because logistically there were only a few options open to the Allies. This book is an excellent refutation to the revisionist who claim that the U. [...]


  • Tim Fay

    Sobering ReadingMy Father and four of my Uncles were due to participate in the invasion of Japan. The few times that they would talk about the war, each one, without exception expected to die in that invasion. All of them said that they had been told to expect five HUNDRED thousand to a MILLION dead or wounded in the FIRST day. Giangreco shows that this was probably an underestimate, based on his extensive research into the war plans of both sides.Truman made the right decision.


  • Matt

    This book is amazing for the simple fact that it really helps you get your mind around the fact that, at the time, VE Day felt like nothing more than the midpoint of a long war that would take years more to enact defeat upon Japan as well. To get into that mindset after the losses up to that point is truly terrifying. That said, this book is almost more like a reference book than a history or monograph; it's got great wealth of details to be consulted, but does not flow the best to read.


  • George Ashmore

    A great book--I was trying to find a source about just what the situation was regarding invading japan vs dropping the bomb. A lot of loud noise insists that the bomb was unnecessary but there was no reason for the people making the decisions and the men ready to do the fighting to believe it. If the Allies had tried a ground invasion, they would have just ended up using more nuclear weapons as tactical weapons--it was never going to be easy.


  • John Reas

    Well written and thoroughly documented analysis of the war plans for the invasion of Japan, and the Imperial forces plans to defend itself down to the last man. If we had not dropped the two bombs that ended the war, the casualties with both the Japanese and the Allies would have been far, far worse. Highly recommended reading for those interested in understanding the plans that we had in place if the Japanese had not capitulated in August, 1945.


  • Debra

    Hard to rate this book. I was ultimately not interested enough in the detailed descriptions of the issues and strategy surrounding the invasion of Japan that ultimately lead to VJ day, but was it the book or my fault?Very detailed, with frequent citations from primary sources, this military history probably deseerves a higher rating if you want the meticulous examination that it provides.


  • Rowdy

    An excellent historical account of the alternative to the use of atomic weapons to end the war with Japan. Those critical of the decision made by President Truman to "drop the bombs" need to read this book. For those looking for evidence that overwhelmingly supports the decision, here it is. The alternative would have been worse - the invasion of Japan.


  • Clifford

    I was interested in the topic, what if we hadn't dropped the bomb? The books answered that question in full detail with the plans for the invasion of Japan. But the answer was so tedious, so many statistics and footnotes. It wasn't a novel like feel or read, it was very dry. Interesting topic but very dry delivery.


  • Rodney Moorhead

    People who question the use of the atomic bombs to end hostilities with Japan in World War 2 should read this book. It is well researched and draws both from Japanese sources and American sources.


  • Cindy

    A comprehensive look at the planned invasion of Japan in 1946 and the view of the atomic bombings in the light of later information.


  • Steve

    Interesting, but fairly dense and difficult to follow in some parts.


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  • [PDF] Download ✓ Hell to Pay: Operation Downfall and the Invasion of Japan, 1945-1947 | by ↠ D.M. Giangreco
    395 D.M. Giangreco
  • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ✓ Hell to Pay: Operation Downfall and the Invasion of Japan, 1945-1947 | by ↠ D.M. Giangreco
    Posted by:D.M. Giangreco
    Published :2019-06-23T04:13:45+00:00