[PDF] ✓ Unlimited ↠ Jesus Made in America: A Cultural History from the Puritans to the Passion of the Christ : by Stephen J. Nichols â

By Stephen J. Nichols | Comments: ( 706 ) | Date: ( Jun 05, 2020 )

Jesus is as American as baseball and apple pie.But how this came to be is a complex story one that Stephen Nichols tells with care and ease Beginning with the Puritans, he leads readers through the various cultural epochs of American history, showing at each stage how American notions of Jesus were shaped by the cultural sensibilities of the times, often with unfortunateJesus is as American as baseball and apple pie.But how this came to be is a complex story one that Stephen Nichols tells with care and ease Beginning with the Puritans, he leads readers through the various cultural epochs of American history, showing at each stage how American notions of Jesus were shaped by the cultural sensibilities of the times, often with unfortunate results.Always fascinating and often humorous, Jesus Made in America offers a frank assessment of the story of Christianity in America, including the present For those interested in the cultural implications of that story, this book is a must read.


  • Title: Jesus Made in America: A Cultural History from the Puritans to the Passion of the Christ
  • Author: Stephen J. Nichols
  • ISBN: 9780830828494
  • Page: 224
  • Format: Paperback

About Author:

Stephen J. Nichols

Stephen J Nichols PhD, Westminster Theological Seminary is president of Reformation Bible College and chief academic officer of Ligonier Ministries Previously, he served as research professor of Christianity and culture at Lancaster Bible College He is an editor with Justin Taylor of the Theologians on the Christian Life series and is the author of several books, including The Reformation, For Us and for Our Salvation, The Church History ABCs, and Bonhoeffer on the Christian Life.



Comments Jesus Made in America: A Cultural History from the Puritans to the Passion of the Christ

  • Eric Chappell

    An interesting history about history's most fascinating character. I read this book as part of a "Cultural Text" book club. Essentially, this book does what we are trying to do by reading cultural texts: listen to and understand culture, speak truth into culture. Nichols' focus is much more limited; he's concerned not with broader culture, but with the portrayal of Christ specifically in evangelicalism' tumultuous history. Beginning with the Puritans and ending with the employ of Jesus in contem [...]


  • Jeff

    While well researched, entertaining, and theologically sound, Jesus Made In America relies too much on a dogmatic tone and one-sided argument to ultimately prove its thesis. Although I agree with most of Nichols’ conclusions, I don’t, however, think that he used the best method to develop his point. Ninety five percent of this book is critical in its tone, as little credibility is given to those for whom the book cites and denounces. This narrow minded, critical approach will only attract an [...]


  • Keren Threlfall

    If ever there was a case in which you should not judge a book by its cover, Jesus Made in America: A Cultural History from the Puritans to "The Passion of the Christ," would be a classic example. Though the cover art leaves you thinking it's going to be a pop-theology book or Jon Acuff-style book (although there is definitely a place for Jon Acuff's books), this book is quite academic in its examination of American church history and theology.Overview Nichols purports that the American Jesus [...]


  • Scott Tsao

    I found this book on Professor Robert Tracy McKenzie's blog Faith and History which I read regularly. Since Professor McKenzie has a great passion in making a connection between Christian faith and US history, this particular book presents itself as one of the most worthwhile readings on this subject. Here are a few excerpts from the blog:"Stephen Nichols is interested particularly in the perceptions of American evangelicals regarding the Man from Nazareth. An evangelical himself (a graduate of [...]


  • Paul

    Nichols presents a history of Jesus in America. He demonstrates how the particular culture or interests of the times frequently shaped our view of Jesus. So the frontiersmen had a rough and rugged Jesus (ass seen in writings and pictures), those who stayed behind to settle eventually wanted their towns to reflect the more civil and gentile Victorianism popular in the big cities, and so we see an effeminate Jesus become predominate among many settlements. As history progresses, we see different J [...]


  • Emmanuel Boston

    Stephen Nichols writes with wit, wisdom, and knowledge. You will find yourself laughing aloud and soon after shaking your head at the truth of his insight. His style is easy to follow. His information is accurate. He relates information in such a way that you can imagine yourself in the era he discusses without ever having been there. But much more importantly, he helps you understand the era… even our own.Book thesis: This book attempts to draw attention to the explicit ways cultural forces h [...]


  • John Defrog

    As someone who has weathered the Moral Majority, the Christian Coalition WWJD and the general politicization of Christianity in America – to include endless arguments over the religious beliefs and intentions of the Founding Fathers – I thought this sounded interesting: a cultural history of American Christianity with a focus on how Jesus has been interpreted (and re-interpreted) by Christians in different historical contexts through the years, though not always necessarily for the better. T [...]


  • Travis Long

    This book belongs alongside Mark Nolls book "The Scandal of The Evangelical Mind" as a great read on the history of evangelical thought on Jesus in America. As a bonus he makes some cool cultural references. He doesn't dive into pop culture much, as his movie chapter would hint at, which is disappointing, but for that Pinskey's book, "The Gospel According to the Simpsons" or Short's "The Gospel according to Peanuts" is a better start.


  • C.E.

    I wanted a history of how Americans adapt Jesus to the wants and needs of the given day. I got an evangelical guidebook on how to return to Puritan glory, which the author saw as a near perfect blend of doctrinal obedience, faith/piety and good works. While pointing out the hypocrisies of the ages, however, the author forgets to ask if HE and his fellow evangelical Christians are not also shaping Jesus "wrongly" as he accuses virtually everyone of doing. Except Jonathon Edwards et al.I found the [...]


  • Tim

    Nichols' book is an odd beast. It's subtitle claims to be a cultural history, but it certainly is not that. Fox and Prothero have done that in recent years about Jesus in America and they are excellent historians of religion and talk much better about the cultural setting than Nichols does, or even attempts to do (Blum and Harvey, The Color of Christ, examines one corner of that as well). Nichols, before the 20th century, tries to write an intellectual sort of history focusing on specific indivi [...]


  • Osvaldo

    Very informative survey and critique of the appropriation of Jesus in American Christianity, with particular focus on Evangelical Christianity, from the time of the Puritans into the twenty-first century. It is a helpful book for American Christians of any tradition for gaining an understanding of how Jesus has been and continues to be appropriated while keeping in mind that the author appears to speak from a Reformed perspective when offering his critiques. It would have been helpful if the aut [...]


  • Brett

    Often with little attention to the historical figure, each subsequent generation of American Christians have re-created the person and ministry of Jesus. This is particularly true to American Evangelicals, the subject of Nichols’ “cultural history.” Using the Puritans (e.g. Jonathan Edwards and Edward Taylor) as the theological standard of American orthodox Christology, Nichols traces the cultural trajectory of Christological beliefs in ensuing generations – as represented by frontier Je [...]


  • Scarlett Sims

    From the cover and title, this book looks very much like a "pop theology" type book. However it is written with a much more scholarly/academic tone than I expected. That's not to say I didn't enjoy it: I did.Nichols traces the various views our culture has had of Jesus since the country's inception and analyzes what those say about our culture and Christian beliefs.My favorite parts were the later chapters where he talks about Jesus as a marketing tool, an empty commodity, a symbol devoid of mea [...]


  • Timothy Bertolet

    This is a good book analyzing the various perspectives on Jesus down through American history. His primarily focus is on culture. Nichols looks briefly at the Puritans, the founding fathers, Victorian culture vs. frontier culture, liberalism vs. fundamentalism, pop evangelical culture and the Jesus of the right vs. the Jesus of the left in politics. Often times he has cogent critiques for both sides. The book contains great warnings for the church that we not loose what is essential to the churc [...]


  • Juli

    A good discussion of the way culture has played a part in the way we as Americans view Jesus and our theology. The author has some opinions that he states pretty blatantly (I might even say rudely) at random times in the book which I didn't like if the book was supposed to be an academic discussion from a historical point. It did make me think more about the culture I am in and how it has affected the way I think about Jesus but I think there are probably better books out there on the same topic [...]


  • Thomas Grosh IV

    Solid challenge for followers of Christ as they consider how much of their understanding of Jesus has been/is being shaped by the larger American culture. As part of Elizabethtown Brethren in Christ Church/InterVarsity's Emerging Scholars Network's "Christian Scholar Series," Stephen Nichols presented on this title and "Jesus for the Academy: Freeing Christ from our Agendas." His material was well received.


  • Don

    A scholarly and readable history of major cultural forces and influences that have effected how the Jesus of the Bible has been understood from the early settlers until the present day in America. A very important read as the author deals with the theology of the Puritans, frontier life, Victorians, civil religion, the founding fathers (in their own words), the proposed Christian Amendment in 1862, the Civil War, Jesus in movies, the Jesus Movement, WWJD and engagement in politics.


  • Scott Korljan

    In my opinion, this is a must read for those in church leadership, especially pastors. Good overview of the various ways which American culture has hijacked Jesus and made him into its own image. The primary point I took away was that we must hold firmly to the complexity of the biblical Jesus. All of the perversions of Jesus that he highlights in this book to some degree or another occurred out of a desire to simply the picture of Jesus in the Gospels.


  • Tim Poole

    Nichols does a good job of surveying America's different ideas of Jesus. I found myself in several of the different era's thinking, much to my own dismay. Christian plumber really made me think about the efficacy of using "Christian" as an adjective. My only critique of Nichols' critique is that not enough of his story comes through in this historical survey.


  • Andria alefhi

    I was interested in the subject matter but this book was too academic and dense. maybe someone else can plow through it and give me a cliff notes version.


  • Lizzy

    A phenomenal book on the ways we've attempted to adapt Christ to our culture since the time of our Founders.


  • John

    Can be a little pessimistic for me at times, but overall, really helpful. Very David Wellsian throughout!


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  • [PDF] ✓ Unlimited ↠ Jesus Made in America: A Cultural History from the Puritans to the Passion of the Christ : by Stephen J. Nichols â
    224 Stephen J. Nichols
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    Posted by:Stephen J. Nichols
    Published :2020-03-17T03:08:56+00:00