[PDF] Download ☆ I Freed Myself: African American Self-Emancipation in the Civil War Era | by ☆ DavidWilliams

By DavidWilliams | Comments: ( 828 ) | Date: ( Mar 28, 2020 )

For a century and a half, Abraham Lincoln s signing of the Emancipation Proclamation has been the dominant narrative of African American freedom in the Civil War era However, David Williams suggests that this portrayal marginalizes the role that African American slaves played in freeing themselves At the Civil War s outset, Lincoln made clear his intent was to save the UFor a century and a half, Abraham Lincoln s signing of the Emancipation Proclamation has been the dominant narrative of African American freedom in the Civil War era However, David Williams suggests that this portrayal marginalizes the role that African American slaves played in freeing themselves At the Civil War s outset, Lincoln made clear his intent was to save the Union rather than free slaves despite his personal distaste for slavery, he claimed no authority to interfere with the institution By the second year of the war, though, when the Union army was in desperate need of black support, former slaves who escaped to Union lines struck a bargain they would fight for the Union only if they were granted their freedom Williams importantly demonstrates that freedom was not simply the absence of slavery but rather a dynamic process enacted by self emancipated African American refugees, which compelled Lincoln to modify his war aims and place black freedom at the center of his wartime policies Challenges the dominant narrative of how African Americans obtained their freedom Is accessible for all reading education levels Brings a new perspective to understanding the emancipation of slaves


  • Title: I Freed Myself: African American Self-Emancipation in the Civil War Era
  • Author: DavidWilliams
  • ISBN: 9781107602496
  • Page: 161
  • Format: Paperback

About Author:

DavidWilliams

Librarian Note There is than one author in the GoodReads database with this name See this thread for information A professor of history at Valdosta State University, David Williams received his Ph.D in history from Auburn University in 1988 The author of numerous articles on Georgia history, the Old South, Appalachia, and the Civil War, Williams is the author of Rich Man s War Class, Caste, and Confederate Defeat in the Lower Chattahoochee Valley and Johnny Reb s War Battlefield and Homefront and the coauthor of Gold Fever America s First Gold Rush and Plain Folk in a Rich Man s War Class and Dissent in Confederate Georgia He lives in Valdosta, Georgia.



Comments I Freed Myself: African American Self-Emancipation in the Civil War Era

  • Jennifer Boyce

    bookreviewsbyme2.wordpressThis was a fascinating read; analyzing the impact that African Americans had on their own emancipation. This book is a technical, yet understandable read, allowing it to be comprehended by readers of variable skill levels.This book gives a comprehensive analysis on the roles African Americans, enslaved or otherwise, played in obtaining their emancipation. It’s not an oft talked about fact that African Americans played a pivotal role in freeing themselves. Without the [...]


  • Kidada

    I Freed Myself is a great text for popular audiences who, unlike historians, haven't read much of the recent scholarship by Stephanie McCurry, Thavolia Glymph, etc. on what some call "the slaves' war" against their masters. Nevertheless, in light of recent focus devoted to the roles Lincoln (Eric Foner's The Fiery Trial), the Union Army (Chandra Manning's What This Cruel War Was Over and Gary Gallagher's The Union War), and congressional Republicans (James Oakes's Freedom National and "Reluctant [...]


  • Donna Davis

    Williams is smoking hot when it comes to the role of African-Americans in the American Civil War. The overstatement that Lincoln freed the slaves rubs many of us, and his thesis that not only did the slaves largely set themselves free, but were pivotal to the Union’s ultimate victory, is a strong one. In Marxist organizations, there is an expression for a political over-correction. It’s called “bending the stick too far back”. The idea is that you want the stick to be straight up, but so [...]


  • Maxine

    It is one of those common truisms of US history that the Civil War was fought over slavery and that Abraham Lincoln is to be universally lauded for his abolitionist spirit that led to the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. It is, in fact, one of the defining moments in American history. However, according to author David Williams, this focus on the role Lincoln played in the war and emancipation is overstated and, worse, hides the crucial role that African Americans themselves played both [...]


  • Trey Shipp

    The role of slaves in their own emancipation isn’t part of the standard American story. It should be. This interesting book recounts heroic acts of slave escapes, revolts and military service. And as slaves grabbed freedom, Williams shows how they pushed a reluctant Lincoln and nation into ending slavery. At the beginning of the Civil War, outside a small group of abolitionists, virtually no whites were ready to end slavery. Even Lincoln had been willing to pass a constitutional amendment guar [...]


  • Sadie Wright

    An Excellent ReadGood book for anyone to add to their collection about the Antebellum South, African Americans or slavery. Many seem to think that black people were docile during the Civil War and simply waited for the Yankees to free them. The truth is slaves shaped their own future and this book discusses the reasons they did and the methods.


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  • [PDF] Download ☆ I Freed Myself: African American Self-Emancipation in the Civil War Era | by ☆ DavidWilliams
    161 DavidWilliams
  • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ☆ I Freed Myself: African American Self-Emancipation in the Civil War Era | by ☆ DavidWilliams
    Posted by:DavidWilliams
    Published :2019-09-21T20:52:44+00:00