[PDF] ✓ Unlimited ↠ What? 108 Zen Poems : by Ko Un Young-Moo Kim Ý

By Ko Un Young-Moo Kim | Comments: ( 567 ) | Date: ( Jul 09, 2020 )

Throughout his eventful life as a monk, poet, novelist, political dissident, husband, and father, Ko Un has remained a traveler on the Way The poems in this collection, though strictly within the true Zen tradition, are as witty and down to earth as they are contemplative Described by Allen Ginsberg as thought stopping Koan like mental firecrackers, the poems reflect bThroughout his eventful life as a monk, poet, novelist, political dissident, husband, and father, Ko Un has remained a traveler on the Way The poems in this collection, though strictly within the true Zen tradition, are as witty and down to earth as they are contemplative Described by Allen Ginsberg as thought stopping Koan like mental firecrackers, the poems reflect both writer and reader First published in 1997, the new edition features a sympathetic translation and 11 original brush paintings by the author.


  • Title: What? 108 Zen Poems
  • Author: Ko Un Young-Moo Kim
  • ISBN: BrotherAnt
  • Page: 469
  • Format: Paperback

About Author:

Ko Un Young-Moo Kim

Ko was born Ko Untae in Gunsan, North Jeolla Province in 1933 He was at Gunsan Middle School when war broke out.The Korean War emotionally and physically traumatized Ko and caused the death of many of his relatives and friends Ko s hearing suffered from acid that he poured into his ears during an acute crisis in this time and it was further harmed by a police beating in 1979 In 1952, before the war had ended, Ko became a Buddhist monk After a decade of monastic life, he chose to return to the active, secular world in 1962 to become a devoted poet From 1963 to 1966 he lived on Jejudo, where he set up a charity school, and then moved back to Seoul His life was not calm in the outer world, and he wound up attempting suicide a second time in 1970.Around the time the South Korean government attempted to curb democracy by putting forward the Yusin Constitution in late 1972, Ko became very active in the democracy movement and led efforts to improve the political situation in South Korea, while still writing prolifically and being sent to prison four times 1974, 1979, 1980 and 1989 In May 1980, during the coup d etat led by Chun Doo hwan, Ko was accused of treason and sentenced to 20 years imprisonment He was released in August 1982 as part of a general pardon.After his release, his life became calmer however, he startled his large following by revising many of his previously published poems Ko married Sang Wha Lee on May 5, 1983, and moved to Anseong, Gyeonggi do, where he still lives He resumed writing and began to travel, his many visits providing fabric for the tapestry of his poems Since 2007, he is a visiting scholar in Seoul National University, and teaches poetics and literature.



Comments What? 108 Zen Poems

  • Steve

    In an earlier review/review/show where I provide a bit of the backstory of Korean poet Ko Un (b. 1933), I mention that he was a Son (Zen) monk for a decade but left the church deeply disappointed. His disappointment was directed at the institution and some persons, but he did not renounce the teachings of Son Buddhism, nor did they stop informing his stance towards life and the world.108 is a significant number in Buddhism, and it is the number of beads in a Buddhist mala, the string of prayer b [...]


  • Riccardo Mainetti

    Ho acquistato questo libro di poesie, sulla fiducia, invogliato dalla recensione fattane dalla mia carissima amica Francesca Giuliani, profonda e insaziabile conoscitrice di libri. E' rimasto per settimane ad occhieggiare dall'applicazione Kindle del mio tablet finchè ieri non mi sono finalmente deciso e ne ho divorato le poesie. Sono poesie per lo più brevi e fulminanti. In poche righe, o meglio, com'è più corretto dire trattandosi di poesie, in pochi versi, l'autore, uno dei più famosi po [...]


  • Joseph

    What?: 108 Zen Poems, by Ko Un. Foreword by Allen Ginsberg. Introduction by Thich Nhat Hanh.The Korean poet and former Buddhist monk Ko Un is one of the great masters of the playful insight. He deploys gentle humor, irreverent wit, Zen non-sequiturs, and compassionate tenderness—sometimes in a single poem! Best read quickly, the way you eat popcorn, or popcorn shrimpHOTo Mountains at dusk:What are you?What are you are you . . Grow high. The devil can't find you.Grow deep. Buddha can't find you [...]


  • Frank Jude

    Ko Un, the Korean 'premier' zen poet and former Buddhist monk, presents 108 short "Zen Poems" which are meant to be read as 'koan--like mental firecrackers.' And while many most certainly do, there are also many that fall 'flat' for western ears with little fore-knowledge of Korean political, and spiritual history.That said, I still appreciate his efforts, and savored many of the offerings in this little collection, and heartily recommend it for anyone feeling any affinity for Zen Buddhism.


  • Mariano Hortal

    Publicado en lecturaylocura/ananda-108-“Ananda. 108 poemas Zen” de Ko Un. Cuando los análisis (y las palabras) sobranEn este post hablé extensamente del poeta surcoreano Ko Un; a propósito de la lectura de “Ananda. 108 poemas Zen” opto por la simplicidad. Que mis palabras no emborronen la claridad y la sapiencia de cada verso del autor oriental. Que me convierta en simple transmisor de su obra. Una obra sencillamente magistral en su minimalismo aunque sin exención de lirismo. Bastan [...]


  • Jessaka

    This was a very nice book of Zen poems although it didn't meet my expectations after reading his wonderful book, "Flowers of the Moment." Ko Un was born in South Korea and was one of the front runners for the Nobel Prize for Literature. He was traumatized by the lost of many of his family and friends in the Korean War. He became a a Zen monk soon after, and after his master left the monastery to get married, he tried to commit suicide. After being a monk for a decade, he returned to secular lif [...]


  • Evan Lien

    I'm only giving this four stars because i didn't understand most of it. Korean poetry is pretty far fetched for me, living in the west, but i decided to give it a shot because of the zen-based therapy i'm undergoing at the moment.And boy did these poems make me thing.A beautiful work of litterature, but it just happened not to me by thing.


  • Maria

    Woops, I didn’t see the notes until I got to them! It’s a nice book though, even if I didn’t ‘get’ everything. Will reread while reading the notes!


  • George Spirakis

    Άλλο Διαφορετικό. Κι ανάμεσά τους κάτι μπορείς να βρεις. Θέλει απλά το χρόνο του."Ε, άνθρωπε, κλάψε μέχρι να σου χυθούν τα μάτια".


  • Patti K

    This small book includes some gems but is overall uneven. Mostly irreverent takes on Zen Buddhism with surprise endings. Still worthwhile.


  • David Gorgone

    Perfect little snapshots of poetry. I am not a buddhist, but I can appreciate their brilliance.


  • Jonathan Tennis

    This is about as zen as a poet can get - ““Mountain is mountain / water is water,” Daineng chanted. / “Mountain is not mountain / water is not water,” Daineng chanted. / Eat your food. / Once you’ve eaten, go shit.” (p. 69, Mountain is Mountain)


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  • [PDF] ✓ Unlimited ↠ What? 108 Zen Poems : by Ko Un Young-Moo Kim Ý
    469 Ko Un Young-Moo Kim
  • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ✓ Unlimited ↠ What? 108 Zen Poems : by Ko Un Young-Moo Kim Ý
    Posted by:Ko Un Young-Moo Kim
    Published :2020-03-01T06:35:03+00:00