[PDF] Download Þ Hoosh: Roast Penguin, Scurvy Day, and Other Stories of Antarctic Cuisine | by ð Jason C. Anthony

By Jason C. Anthony | Comments: ( 993 ) | Date: ( Dec 11, 2019 )

Anthony s tour of Antarctic cuisine takes us from hoosh a porridge of meat, fat, and melted snow, often thickened with crushed biscuit and the scurvy ridden expeditions of Shackleton and Scott through the twentieth century to his own preplanned three hundred meals plus snacks for a two person camp in the Transantarctic Mountains The stories in Hoosh are linked by theAnthony s tour of Antarctic cuisine takes us from hoosh a porridge of meat, fat, and melted snow, often thickened with crushed biscuit and the scurvy ridden expeditions of Shackleton and Scott through the twentieth century to his own preplanned three hundred meals plus snacks for a two person camp in the Transantarctic Mountains The stories in Hoosh are linked by the ingenuity, good humor, and indifference to gruel that make Anthony s tale as entertaining as it is enlightening.


  • Title: Hoosh: Roast Penguin, Scurvy Day, and Other Stories of Antarctic Cuisine
  • Author: Jason C. Anthony
  • ISBN: 9780803226661
  • Page: 400
  • Format: Paperback

About Author:

Jason C. Anthony

Hoosh awards 1 an Andre Simon Food and Drink Book Award in the UK 2 Winner of a ForeWord Book of the Year Award Travel 3 Silver Medal, Independent Publisher Book Award Creative Non Fiction 4 Finalist, Maine Book Awards Nonfiction In other award news, I was a finalist for the Ellen Meloy Desert Writing AwardJason C Anthony s Antarctic essays and articles have appeared in various magazines and anthologies, including Orion, VQR, The Smart Set, WorldHum, Alimentum, The Missouri Review, The Best American Travel Writing 2007, and as a Notable Essay in The Best American Essays 2006 He spent eight seasons working in Antarctica as part of the United States Antarctic Program He lives in Maine.



Comments Hoosh: Roast Penguin, Scurvy Day, and Other Stories of Antarctic Cuisine

  • Petra X

    Antarctic cuisine may have started off with hoosh, which was everything nasty and meaty you can think of bound together by vast quantities of fat, but it ended up with Russian caviar and vodka. It's a civilized sort of place now, food orders put in the season before nothing is off-limits. There is only one mystery. Why all the food at the base is kept in vast industrial-size freezers but in the field they just leave it outside in the sub-zero temperatures? Why not just have an unheated storeroom [...]


  • Cissa

    I was excited to learn about this book! It combines 2 of my fascinations: Antarctica, and food/cooking, so I eagerly anticipated it, and it did not disappoint.The author points out that of all the books written about Antarctica, almost all are written either by people there for a brief stay, or researchers and scientists and something like 80% of the people who live and work on the Ice are neither, but are support staff, with a very different perspective. This is one of those books, as is "Cold, [...]


  • Jo

    I'm not a big reader of non-fiction, and have no interest in cookbooks or culinary literature, but I loved this book - the tone wry, the information interesting, the language at times poetic. The focus on food as a survival tool and motivating fantasy, then turning to poor quality cafeteria slush, belatedly improved, is an incredible journey in itself and addresses the problem of how to feed people in the remotest, harshest environment in the world. The writer only lays judgement around the occa [...]


  • Karen

    Finished in a nothing-to-do-but-read sprint brought on by a relentless downpour.


  • Stacy

    Non-fictional account of how various expeditions to Antarctica survived, and what (and how) they ate.Basically -the earliest ones barely lived, IF they lived. Some ate seals, penguins, and fish. Later ones ate all of that, as well as canned foods. Some ate their sled dogs. That's where I lost interest. I couldn't handle reading about that. The dryness of the descriptions and the detachment with which such sacrifices were listed were unbearable. Later expeditions had better resources and apparent [...]


  • Nightwitch

    This book was astonishingly readable. The tone changes a little from the historic sections to the contemporary, although both are very interesting, and I definitely do not recommend reading if you are an animal lover or at all squeamish; the amount of suffering endured and committed (on hapless wildlife, sled dogs, ponies, and each other) by the nineteenth-century polar explorers is, um, high.


  • Steven

    I wasn't sure that a writer could sustain an entire book-length work on Antarctic food history. I was really, really wrong. Anthony, with many seasons of Antarctic experience at McMurdo station and other locations around the continent, expertly uses food (and hunger) as a focal point around which he recaps the history of the human presence at that end of the world.I was familiar with many of the earlier stories surrounding expeditions, surviving on a mix of pemican and biscuits, from which the t [...]


  • Matthew Ciarvella

    I can't recall ever reading a book that both grossed me out and made me as hungry as "Hoosh."I love adventure writing. I'm the quintessential armchair explorer; I've never ventured further than the woods and deserts of my own country, but I love reading about the people who've gone further than I ever will. And one of my favorite details for any bit of adventure writing is when the author actually takes the time to talk about the details, the logistics, the nitty gritty. Things like what they at [...]


  • Maureen Stanton

    This is a wonderful book--beautifully written and fascinating. Jason Anthony did a remarkable job curating this in-depth exploration of the cuisine of the Antarctic, which is a brilliant idea in itself--looking at this extreme environment through one of its most challenging aspects: food. I found myself eager to return to this narrative each night, to become absorbed in the tales both heroic and mundane of 20th-century Antarctic exploration via the stomach. The elegance of the writing pleases as [...]


  • Anna

    Definitely a variation on my usual ice and death, cold book theme. I knew a reasonable amount of the historical information about Antarctic expeditions, diets and the path of progress to preventing scurvy etc. But I had no idea about what folks are eating now at McMurdo, Odell etc. I don't think I quite realized how many people are down there especially in the summer. There is even a green house although there is still a shortage of "freshies". And that new Concordia place is quite fancy! The ot [...]


  • Lara

    Really fascinating look at Antarctic cuisine from the earliest expeditions to modern times. I think Anthony did a great job here of writing about the early explorers in particular in a way that felt fresh and interesting and not like he was just spewing facts taken directly from their original accounts (which is how a lot of authors sound when they talk about these guys). He also discusses several lesser-known expeditions, which I found especially intriguing, and I'm planning on tracking down a [...]


  • Annie Smidt

    Oh, we'll done! If you love Antarctic adventures, domestic-life minutiae, and recipes for seal brains, you are in luck!A terrific mix of history distant and recent seen though the peculiar lens of trying to eat on a mostly foodless continent. Visits with all your favorite Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration friends, and intros to some new ones -- and all of their cooks. Details about life in modern Antartica and how it came to be that way. So much loving description of food, for its scarcity, be [...]


  • Jack Buechner

    Having been granted the rare opportunity to visit Antarctica and even stand on the spot of the "magnetic pole" which is adorned with an old-fashioned barber red/white pole topped off with a reflective garden globe, I have tried to read from Shackleton to Amundson to Scott to Perry and all that have lived on the bottom of the world. What I had not known (until this wonderfully informative and humorous book) is how these explorers survived and on what. Hoosh (from which the booze word HOOCH is der [...]


  • Emily

    Really interesting stuff. I expected to be most interested in the historic sections and skip over the modern Antarctica stuff, but the reverse was true. I found the middle part of the book dragging and repetitive, but the interview with the head chef at McMurdo, the contrast between the food at the Russian, American, and French/Italian research stations, the issues cooking at the extreme high-altitude, low-humidity South Pole station those things were fascinating and really made the book worth r [...]


  • Edward Sullivan

    Fascinating stories of remarkable resourcefulness in Antarctic cuisine throughout the history of the continent's exploration. It's unlikely these dishes will appeal to anyone outside of the most desperately hungry.


  • Brad

    Excellent book. Great overview of old Antarctic exploration, focusing on what, let's face it, was most important -- the food. The modern stuff was interesting, too; quite liked the chapter on Vostok.


  • Sue Rosenbaum

    A great book for anyone who loves reading about polar exploration as well as food and cooking. Antarctic history, descriptions of meals through the ages, anecdotes and the author's personal experiences combine to produce a fascinating and well-written book.


  • Tom

    I told my wife that she should get the author for her Food history group. this is a fun book!


  • Brett Amy

    A fascinating glimpse at life in Antarctica, from the historic "heroic" era of Shackleton and other explorers through the modern-day industrial complex at McMurdo.


  • Chris

    Ties with Nicholas Johnson's "Big Dead Place" as the best book written about Antarctica.


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  • [PDF] Download Þ Hoosh: Roast Penguin, Scurvy Day, and Other Stories of Antarctic Cuisine | by ð Jason C. Anthony
    400 Jason C. Anthony
  • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download Þ Hoosh: Roast Penguin, Scurvy Day, and Other Stories of Antarctic Cuisine | by ð Jason C. Anthony
    Posted by:Jason C. Anthony
    Published :2019-09-23T21:53:39+00:00