Best Read [WilliamDietrich] ✓ Northwest Passage || [Science Fiction Book] PDF ↠

By WilliamDietrich | Comments: ( 491 ) | Date: ( May 30, 2020 )

When Lewis and Clark reached the Columbia River in 1805, they found a roaring and unruly river with a treacherous mouth and confusing course, boasting salmon runs without equal in the world William Dietrich, Pulitzer Prize winning reporter and author of The Final Forest, reveals the heroic stories, triumphant engineering, and disturbing taming of this powerful, beautifulWhen Lewis and Clark reached the Columbia River in 1805, they found a roaring and unruly river with a treacherous mouth and confusing course, boasting salmon runs without equal in the world William Dietrich, Pulitzer Prize winning reporter and author of The Final Forest, reveals the heroic stories, triumphant engineering, and disturbing taming of this powerful, beautiful river Northwest Passage is a masterwork of history, geography, and science, a sweeping overview of the transformation of the Columbia from its geologic origins and aboriginal inhabitants to its pioneers, settlers, dam builders, farmers, and contemporary native Americans The Columbia is the second largest river, by volume, in the U.S and the largest on the west coast of the Western Hemisphere Its terrain varies from rain forests with than 100 inches of precipitation a year to desert with as little as 5 inches per year It was once the most inexhaustible of rivers with as many as 16 million fish pushing up its 1,200 mile length each year to spawn and die in its hundreds of tributaries, a run supporting one of the most populous and complex native cultures on the continent Before the European discovery of the Columbia River, dreaming merchants and intrepid explorers risked their lives and their money to find the entrance to and navigate the wildly unpredictable course of this Great River of the West Native Americans clung to the Columbia as the root of their culture, colonizers came in search of productive land and an efficient trade route, and industrialists seeking energy transformed the region s wild beauty The Columbia of today is a product of its yesterdays It is docile, run by engineers and turned onand off by valves with fourteen major dams on the river and than 500 in its basin The obstacle course of falls, boulders, whirlpools, and floods has been harnessed and provides 70 percent of the Northwest s energy Yet these dams, plus pollution, irrigation, and growth, have


  • Title: Northwest Passage
  • Author: WilliamDietrich
  • ISBN: 9780295975467
  • Page: 170
  • Format: Paperback

About Author:

WilliamDietrich

William Dietrich is a NY Times bestelling author of the Ethan Gage series of eight books which have sold into 28 languages He is also the author of six other adventure novels, several nonfiction works on the environmental history of the Pacific Northwest, and a contributor to several books.Bill was a career journalist, sharing a Pulitzer for national reporting at the Seattle Times for coverage of the Exxon Valdez oil spill He taught environmental journalism at Huxley College, a division of Western Washington University, and was adviser to Planet Magazine there He was Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, and received several National Science Foundation fellowships for reporting on science His travels have taken him from the South Pole to the Arctic, and from the Dead Sea to the base camp of Mount Everest The traveling informs his books He lives in Anacortes, WA, in the San Juan islands, and is a fan of books, movies, history, science, and the outdoors.



Comments Northwest Passage

  • Judy

    A comprehensive history of the Columbia River and the Columbia River Basin, written in 1994. Beginning with Native Americans and the European explorers, Dietrich turns us to the Grand Coulee and Bonneville Dam Projects which has led to a series of 14 dams on the Columbia itself and over 500 dams in the Columbia River Basin. He addresses both the benefits to people and the damage to salmon and the ecosystem of the river. Much has happened since 1995, but this is a fine study.


  • Becky

    Incredibly detailed, well-organized history of the Columbia River. I love it for its rich grounding, endless side trails and anecdotes and factoids, and thoughtful attention to people, not just perspectives, on different sides of the issues it addresses.Perhaps most riveting to me was the history of rural electrification and the way it was framed partially as an issue of equalization, freeing women from drudgery.


  • Nick Hodge

    An overview of the white man's history of a vast geographical area. The author manages to reduce the scope by skipping quickly over the First Nations culture that had existed for ??,000 years, almost everything above the 49th parallel, and the early influence of the Metis. What's left? The unconscious transition from a salmon economy to an electrical and irrigation economy. Way too long a book - a poem would have done.


  • George

    Read on our trip to Portland, Mt St Helen's and up the Columbia and Snake Rivers into Hell's Canyon. Gives an excellent description of the history of the Columbia and all the issues concerning its transformation to one of West's wildest and most beautiful and bountiful rivers into a computerized water way for electricity generation and irrigation. Is there any hope for the wild Salmon?


  • Brian

    some great information if you are interested in the history of the Columbia. Well organized and reads like a well written journalist report. The information on the current status is dated, as the book was written in 1996 but the historical information and the personalization of the relationships between the Columbia and the people that have lived on and around it was excellent.


  • Don

    A bit dated now (1995) but a solid overview of what the Columbia is and was, and how it can't continue to be all things for all people. Lots of good information and insights, as a newsman tries to take a balanced approach to a controversial topic.


  • Debbie Stone

    I loved this book. I grew up on the Columbia River, so very interesting to me to read the history.


  • Coho Cabin

    A great history of the river that shaped our beloved Pacific Northwest.


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  • Best Read [WilliamDietrich] ✓ Northwest Passage || [Science Fiction Book] PDF ↠
    170 WilliamDietrich
  • thumbnail Title: Best Read [WilliamDietrich] ✓ Northwest Passage || [Science Fiction Book] PDF ↠
    Posted by:WilliamDietrich
    Published :2020-02-03T03:08:23+00:00